Sustainability

Energy & Waste

The global food industry is a major energy user, accounting for around 126TWh per year, that’s the equivalent of about 14% of the UK total energy consumption. We realise that growing via artificial lighting solutions requires more electricity than plants grown outdoors. Yet on the bright side, the LEDs that we use to grow in our Clapham farm are extremely efficient requiring very little energy to make our little plants grow. More importantly, to tackle the carbon emissions from our energy usage, ZCF has committed to only using 100% renewable energy sources across all our sites wherever possible. Looking ahead, our next farm will have renewable energy at the core of its design and will be linked to nearby wind or solar sources. Moreover, we are also considering alternative approaches which offer a more cyclical solution.

Good Energy’s green credentials and pioneering solution for the UK climate crisis makes them a leading choice of energy partner for ZCF. They were the first company in the UK to offer 100% clean, renewable energy generated here in Britain from sun, wind, water and biomass, compared to other energy providers that only offer between 33% – 56%.

They were also involved in the Paris Climate Agreement, liaising with experts, analysts and individuals at the heart of the discussions and decision-making process.

Find out more about Good Energy’s fuel mix breakdown here.

The LEDs that we use to grow in our Clapham farm are extremely efficient requiring very little energy to make our little plants grow.

We want to be sustainable at every stage of our process. So wherever there is a chance for us to mash two potatoes with one fork, we want to exploit that. One such link is between waste & energy. Already our Clapham farm’s non-recyclable waste is sent away to be used to generate energy. We want to replicate a similar model in-house to ensure that our closed-loop system is as robust as possible. As part of this, non-recyclable waste generated from the activities at our next farm will be disposed of via an on-site anaerobic digester.

As the UK transitions to net zero by 2050, our approach to growing will offer an increasingly competitive model to reshape the growing industry and match the UK’s changing infrastructure in terms of energy, waste disposal and more.

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